About Emily Leshner

Emily Leshner is AP’s communications manager. She produces AP.org and digital communications for AP's global staff. She’s passionate about video production, digital media and photography. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyLeshner_AP.

AP marks 70th anniversary of famous Iwo Jima photo

On Feb. 23, 1945, a 33-year-old Associated Press photographer who had been rejected from the Army because of poor eyesight took a photograph that would ultimately become one of the most recognizable and reproduced images in history. The photographer was Joe Rosenthal; his image depicted five Marines and a Navy corpsman hoisting an American flag atop Mt. Suribachi on the fifth day of the Battle of Iwo Jima.

U.S. flag raised atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima, Feb. 23, 1945. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal)

U.S. flag raised atop Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima, Feb. 23, 1945. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal)

On Sunday, Feb. 25, two days after Rosenthal had pressed the shutter on his 4 x 5 Speed Graphic camera, the photograph made the front page of several major newspapers. Its impact was immediate. Three of the surviving men in the photo were summoned home and hailed as heroes. The image was made into a postage stamp and was chosen as the symbol of a war bond drive. After the war, it was turned into a bronze statue at the U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, was the subject of several books and television documentaries and featured in films.

In this 1998 interview from the AP Corporate Archives, Rosenthal describes the sequence of events that led to his photograph. (Rosenthal is being interviewed by Hal Buell, a longtime photo director who spent more than 40 years with AP.)

See more of Joe Rosenthal’s photography at APImages.com.

Behind the scenes: Down below

One of the perks of being a reporter is that your beat can take you to some places that most people will never have the chance to experience. For AP reporter Dylan Lovan, one such place was deep inside a coal mine.

Listen to him describe the obstacles facing a reporter who wants permission to see mining operations up close and the strict safety requirements, including the need to carry a 10-minute oxygen canister on his hip while down below:

AP reporter Dylan Lovan, left, interviews U.S. Assistant Secretary of Labor Joseph Main, center, in southern Indiana’s Gibson North coal mine. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

AP reporter Dylan Lovan, left, interviews U.S. Assistant Secretary of Labor Joseph Main, center, in southern Indiana’s Gibson North coal mine. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Once Lovan emerged from the depths of the earth, he wrote a report on five key things to know about underground coal mining.

Lovan is a print/video reporter who covers religion, the coal industry and the environment in Kentucky. Follow him on Twitter.

Super Bowl through the years: Off the field with AP photographers

The Associated Press has covered every Super Bowl since the first in 1967. Here’s a look at AP photographers, editors and technicians at work covering football’s biggest contest through the years.


As recently as the early 1990s, photographers were still “souping” film in makeshift darkrooms at the stadium. Transmitting a single color photo over phone lines from the big game took about a half-hour per photo. But the introduction of digital cameras and transmitters in the mid-1990s changed that, saving time and eventually improving technical quality.

Boston-based photographer Elise Amendola on the field during the NFL Super Bowl XX football game Jan. 26, 1986 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Boston-based photographer Elise Amendola on the field during the NFL Super Bowl XX football game Jan. 26, 1986 in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

From front, photographers Spencer Jones, Rob Kozloff, Claudia Counts and Brian Horton work from a trailer for the NFL Super Bowl XXV football game in Tampa, January 1991. (AP Corporate Archives photo)

From front, photo editors Spencer Jones, Rob Kozloff, Claudia Counts and Brian Horton work from a trailer for the NFL Super Bowl XXV football game in Tampa, January 1991. (AP Corporate Archives photo)

Photographers Mark Humphrey, foreground, of Nashville and Cliff Schiappa of Kansas City work at Leafax negative transmitters, sending photos from a trailer for the NFL Super Bowl XXV football game in Tampa, January 1991. (AP Corporate Archives photo)

Photographers Mark Humphrey, foreground, of Nashville and Cliff Schiappa of Kansas City work at Leafax negative transmitters, sending photos from a trailer for the NFL Super Bowl XXV football game in Tampa, January 1991. (AP Corporate Archives photo)

Regional Photo Editor Melissa Einberg at the NFL Super Bowl XXXV in Tampa, Jan. 28, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Regional Photo Editor Melissa Einberg at the NFL Super Bowl XXXV football game in Tampa, Jan. 28, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Photo editor Brian Horton at the NFL Super Bowl XXXV in Tampa, Jan. 28, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Photo editor Brian Horton at the NFL Super Bowl XXXV football game in Tampa, Jan. 28, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Photographer Doug Mills, center, at the NFL Super Bowl XXXVI in New Orleans, Feb. 3, 2002. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Photographer Doug Mills, center, at the NFL Super Bowl XXXVI football game in New Orleans, Feb. 3, 2002. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Photo News Editor Stephanie Mullen, left, and photographer Ric Feld walk to the Superdome in New Orleans for NFL Super Bowl XXXVI, Feb. 3, 2002. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Photo News Editor Stephanie Mullen, left, and photographer Ric Feld walk to the Superdome in New Orleans for NFL Super Bowl XXXVI football game, Feb. 3, 2002. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

Boston-based photographer Elise Amendola prepares to make pictures of the trophy presentation to the Tampa Bay Bucs in NFL Super Bowl XXXVII football game Jan. 26, 2003 in San Diego, California. Amendola is wearing a backpack with a small laptop for transmitting  images to the AP photo trailer. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Boston-based photographer Elise Amendola prepares to make pictures of the trophy presentation to the Tampa Bay Bucs in NFL Super Bowl XXXVII football game Jan. 26, 2003 in San Diego, California. Amendola is wearing a backpack with a small laptop for transmitting images to the AP photo trailer. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

National Enterprise photographer Amy Sancetta uses a mini-disk recorder to collect audio from Tampa Bay head coach Jon Gruden's press conference before the NFL Super Bowl XXXVII football game Jan. 23 ,2003 in San Diego, California.

National Enterprise photographer Amy Sancetta uses a mini-disk recorder to collect audio from Tampa Bay head coach Jon Gruden’s press conference before the NFL Super Bowl XXXVII football game Jan. 23, 2003 in San Diego, California. (AP Photo)

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Seattle-based photographer Elaine Thompson on the field following the NFL Super Bowl XXXVII football game Jan. 23, 2003 in San Diego, California. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Sometimes the Super Bowl presents AP staff, who are brought together from around the U.S. to cover the game, the opportunity for a reunion. Certain traditions, like the deep frying of a turkey by the late photographer Dave Martin, provide staff a moment of respite and a chance to reconvene.

Photographer and South Regional Editor Dave Martin, center, deep fries a turkey outside the AP photo trailer at the Super Bowl in Detroit, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2006. Standing to the left of Martin is Global Photo Operations Manager Tim Donnelly. It had become a tradition for Martin to deep fry turkeys at major events for the enjoyment of AP staff and other journalists. Martin died after collapsing on the Georgia Dome field while covering the Chick-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta, Jan. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Cliff Schiappa)

South Regional Photo Editor Dave Martin, right, deep fries a turkey outside the AP photo trailer at the Super Bowl in Detroit, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2006. Standing to the left of Martin is Global Photo Operations Manager Tim Donnelly. It had become a tradition for Martin to deep fry turkeys at major events for the enjoyment of AP staff and other journalists. Martin died after collapsing on the Georgia Dome field while covering the Chick-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta, Jan. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Cliff Schiappa)

Indianapolis-based photographer Mike Conroy on the field at the start of the NFL Super Bowl XL Feb. 5, 2006 in Detroit, Michigan. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Indianapolis-based photographer Mike Conroy on the field at the start of the NFL Super Bowl XL Feb. 5, 2006 in Detroit, Michigan. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Global Photo Operations Manager Tim Donnelly, right, checks St. Louis-based photographer Jeff Roberson's transmitting device on the field following the NFL Super Bowl XLI Feb. 4, 2007 in Miami, Florida. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Global Photo Operations Manager Tim Donnelly, right, checks St. Louis-based photographer Jeff Roberson’s transmitting device on the field following the NFL Super Bowl XLI Feb. 4, 2007 in Miami, Florida. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

During 2013’s Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans, the Baltimore Ravens were leading the San Francisco 49ers 28-6 when most of the lights in the 73,000-seat Superdome went out in the third quarter. While fans and players waited for the stadium to regain power, AP reporters and editors relied on AP generators and jet packs with Wi-Fi hotspots to continue covering the night’s events.

Deputy Director of Photography Denis Paquin, front left, and colleagues edit during the Super Bowl blackout, Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, at the Superdome in New Orleans. (AP Photo/ Julie Jacobson)

Deputy Director of Photography Denis Paquin, front left, and colleagues edit during the Super Bowl blackout, Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, at the Superdome in New Orleans. (AP Photo/ Julie Jacobson)

Washington Assistant Chief of Bureau David Ake edits during the Super Bowl blackout, Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, at the Superdome in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Washington Assistant Chief of Bureau David Ake edits during the Super Bowl blackout, Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013, at the Superdome in New Orleans. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Photographers Matt Slocum, left, and Mark Humphrey, right, in red, covering Denver Broncos Peyton Manning during media day for the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Photographers Matt Slocum, left, and Mark Humphrey, right, in red, cover Denver Broncos Peyton Manning during media day for the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Technology specialist Jorge Nunez, far left, watches as Global Photo Operations Manager Tim Donnelly and Houston-based photographer David Phillip, right, install a robotic camera on the catwalk in preparation for Super Bowl XLIX, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015. (Photo by Denis Paquin)

Technology specialist Jorge Nunez, far left, watches as Global Photo Operations Manager Tim Donnelly and Houston-based photographer David Phillip, right, install a robotic camera on the catwalk in preparation for the NFL Super Bowl XLIX football game, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)

Photographers David Phillip, left, and Morry Gash work on a robotic camera in preparation for for Super Bowl XLIX, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015. (Photo by Denis Paquin)

Photographers David Phillip, left, and Morry Gash work on a robotic camera in preparation for the NFL Super Bowl XLIX football game, Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin)

Photographer Charlie Riedel shown during  Super Bowl XLIX Media Day at the U.S. Airways Arena in Phoenix, Ariz., Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kazdan)

Photographer Charlie Riedel takes photos of New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (not pictured) using a camera attached to a monopod during the NFL Super Bowl XLIX Media Day at the U.S. Airways Arena in Phoenix, Ariz., Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kazdan)

Photographer Charlie Riedel takes photos from the stands during the NFL Super Bowl XLIX Media Day at the U.S Airways Arena in Phoenix, Ariz., Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kazdan)

Photographer Charlie Riedel takes photos from the stands during the NFL Super Bowl XLIX Media Day at the U.S Airways Arena in Phoenix, Ariz., Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kazdan)

In recognition of the game’s rich history, AP is hosting a photo exhibit of its Super Bowl game coverage. “Super Moments, Superstars, Super Game—An Associated Press Exhibit” is on display at Gallery Glendale, 9830 W. Westgate Blvd., in Glendale, Arizona, until Feb. 1.